Is Google Instant killing SEO?

Google just unveiled its new project Google Instant. As you start typing into the search box, Google tries to predict what you are searching for (most likely using the Google Suggest algorithm), and instantly displays results for that prediction. So it’s not really displaying results as you type but kind of before you type. For now, this feature is only available to logged in Google users and is therefore also the next step of personalized search.

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Introducing HTML5: A Book From the Future

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Today I received the highly praised book “Introducing HTML5″ by Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp. I was pretty surprised, when I opened it and found out that this book must have come from the future. The first page tells me that its copyright is from 2011. How is that possible? Is that a typo or is that just due to the futuristic nature of the topic? Is it safe to read it now or do I have to wait till next year?

Update: I just received word from Peachpit, saying that any of their books published after June carry the next copyright year. Thanks. That was quick.

Google Mails’ new look

When I opened Google Mail this morning (the first thing I do on a work day), it greeted me with a new look and some info about the visual changes. The GMail team has moved “Contacts” and “Tasks” further into the forefront. I haven’t had to use these features in the past, mainly because of GMail’s automcompletion when typing the recipient’s address. This might be a huge improvement for some users but not for me, as of yet. I might look deeper into what “Contacts” could do for me but because I mainly use “Things”, I have no need for “Tasks” in Google Mail.

They also decreased the size of the header and thereby moved the list of messages up by *drumroll* 16 pixels. Should I care about this? I’m not sure.

But what I really like is that they shed (most) rounded corners. Although such a visual feature is nice, it’s nothing more than pure eye candy with no practical use whatsoever. I assume that the Google Mail team threw these rounded corners overboard in favor of overall performance and I congratulate them for this step.